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Gynae Care

Gynae Care

At Chennai Gynae Clinic, our main aim is to provide the most up to date care in the complete range of gynaecological problems. This care is provided by a multi-disciplinary team of specialists who have expert knowledge in their particular field of interest. Research and development in the latest clinical care and treatment is an important part of our work. We aim to offer our patients efficient and rapid access to the treatment of their choice.

Chennai Gynae Clinic is also a centre for gynaecological oncology, uro-gynaecology and reproductive medicine. The unit specialises in modern minimally invasive techniques for surgery, enabling a shorter stay in hospital and a quicker recovery to normal activities.

Most of our gynaecological service is housed in brand new facilities, which enables us to provide clinical excellence in a modern purpose built environment.

Common Gynecologic Symptoms:

Depending on your gynecologic condition, you may experience one or more of the following symptoms

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Other Symptoms

Gynecologic Conditions

A wide variety of benign (non-cancerous) conditions may affect a woman's reproductive system. Your reproductive system consists of your uterus, vagina, ovaries and fallopian tubes.

Common types of gynecologic conditions such as fibroids (non-cancerous growths in the uterine wall), endometriosis (non-cancerous growths of the uterine lining) or prolapse (falling or slipping of the uterus) – can cause chronic pain and heavy bleeding, as well as other disabling symptoms.

Treatment Options

The treatments or surgical options available to you will depend on many factors, such as your physical condition, stage of your disease and personal preferences.When medicine, lifestyle changes and other non-invasive treatments do not ease your symptoms, your doctor may recommend surgery.

Gynecologic surgery is recommended for women facing: cervical and uterine cancer, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, pelvic prolapse and excessive bleeding (menorrhagia).

Subfertility

If getting pregnant has been a challenge for you and your partner, you're not alone. Infertility is defined as not being able to get pregnant despite having frequent, unprotected sex for at least a year for most people and six months in certain circumstances.

Infertility may be due to a single cause in either you or your partner, or a combination of factors that may prevent a pregnancy from occurring or continuing. Fortunately, there are many safe and effective therapies for overcoming infertility. These treatments significantly improve the chances of becoming pregnant.

Symptoms

Most couples achieve pregnancy within the first six months of trying. Overall, after 12 months of frequent unprotected intercourse, about 90 percent of couples will become pregnant. The majority of couples will eventually conceive, with or without treatment.

The main sign of infertility is the inability for a couple to get pregnant. There may be no other obvious symptoms.

In some cases, an infertile woman may have irregular or absent menstrual periods. Rarely, an infertile man may have some signs of hormonal problems, such as changes in hair growth or sexual function.

When to see a doctor

In general, don't be too concerned about infertility unless you and your partner have been trying regularly to conceive for at least one year. Talk with your doctor earlier, however, if you're a woman and:

  • You're age 35 to 40 and have been trying to conceive for six months or longer
  • You're over age 40, so you should begin testing or treatment right away
  • You menstruate irregularly or not at all
  • Your periods are very painful
  • You have known fertility problems
  • You've been diagnosed with endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease
  • You've had more than one miscarriage
  • You've had prior cancer treatment

If you're a man, talk with your doctor if you have:

  • Low sperm count or other problems with sperm
  • A history of testicular, prostate or sexual problems
  • You've had prior cancer treatment

Ovarian cysts

Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs or pockets within or on the surface of an ovary. Women have two ovaries — each about the size and shape of an almond — located on each side of the uterus. Eggs (ova) develop and mature in the ovaries and are released in monthly cycles during your childbearing years.

Many women have ovarian cysts at some time during their lives. Most ovarian cysts present little or no discomfort and are harmless. The majority of ovarian cysts disappear without treatment within a few months.

However, ovarian cysts — especially those that have ruptured — sometimes produce serious symptoms. The best ways to protect your health are to know the symptoms that may signal a more significant problem, and to schedule regular pelvic examinations.

Symptoms

Most cysts don't cause any symptoms and go away on their own. A large ovarian cyst can cause abdominal discomfort. If a large cyst presses on your bladder, you may feel the need to urinate more frequently because bladder capacity is reduced.

The symptoms of ovarian cysts, if present, may include:

  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Pelvic pain a constant or intermittent dull ache that may radiate to your lower back and thighs
  • Pelvic pain shortly before your period begins or just before it ends
  • Pelvic pain during intercourse (dyspareunia)
  • Pain during bowel movements or pressure on your bowels
  • Nausea, vomiting or breast tenderness similar to that experienced during pregnancy
  • Fullness or heaviness in your abdomen
  • Pressure on your rectum or bladder that causes a need to urinate more frequently or difficulty emptying your bladder completely

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder among women of reproductive age. The name of the condition comes from the appearance of the ovaries in most, but not all, women with the disorder — enlarged and containing numerous small cysts located along the outer edge of each ovary (polycystic appearance).

Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. In adolescents, infrequent or absent menstruation may signal the condition. In women past adolescence, difficulty becoming pregnant or unexplained weight gain may be the first sign.

Polycystic ovary syndrome signs and symptoms often begin soon after a woman first begins having periods (menarche). In some cases, PCOS develops later on during the reproductive years, for instance, in response to substantial weight gain.

Signs and symptoms vary from person to person, in both type and severity. To be diagnosed with the condition, your doctor looks for at least two of the following:

Menstrual abnormality:

This is the most common characteristic. Examples of menstrual abnormality include menstrual intervals longer than 35 days; fewer than eight menstrual cycles a year; failure to menstruate for four months or longer; and prolonged periods that may be scant or heavy.

Excess androgen:

Elevated levels of male hormones (androgens) may result in physical signs, such as excess facial and body hair (hirsutism), adult acne or severe adolescent acne, and male-pattern baldness (androgenic alopecia). However, the physical signs of androgen excess vary with ethnicity, so depending on your ethnic background you may or may not show signs of excess androgen. For instance, women of Northern European or Asian descent may not be affected.

Polycystic ovaries:

Enlarged ovaries containing numerous small cysts can be detected by ultrasound. Despite the condition's name, polycystic ovaries alone do not confirm the diagnosis. To be diagnosed with PCOS, you must also have abnormal menstrual cycles or signs of androgen excess. Some women with polycystic ovaries may not have PCOS, while a few women with the condition have ovaries that appear normal.

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

What is premenstrual syndrome (PMS)?

Most women have tender breasts, bloating, and muscle aches a few days before they start their menstrual periods. These are normal premenstrual symptoms. But when they affect your daily life, they are called premenstrual syndrome (PMS). PMS can affect your body as well as your mood. Sometimes it can make you change the way you act.

Some women first get PMS in their teens or 20s. Others don't get it until their 30s. The symptoms may get worse in your late 30s and 40s, as you approach perimenopause.

What causes PMS?

PMS is tied to hormone changes that happen during your menstrual cycle. Doctors don't fully know why premenstrual symptoms are worse in some women than in others. They do know that for many women, PMS runs in the family.

Not getting enough vitamin B6, calcium, or magnesium in the foods you eat can increase your chances of getting PMS. High stress, a lack of exercise, and too much caffeine can make your symptoms worse.

What seems like PMS might be caused by something else. Your treatment will change if your symptoms are not tied to PMS.

What are the symptoms?

PMS symptoms can affect your body, your mood, and how you act in the days or week leading up to your menstrual period.

Physical signs include:

  • Acne.
  • Bloating and tender breasts.
  • Food cravings.
  • Lack of energy.
  • Cramps.
  • Headaches.
  • Low back pain.
  • Multiple fetuses such as twins or triplets.

When you have PMS, you might also:

  • Feel sad, angry, or anxious.
  • Be less alert.
  • Food cravings.
  • Find it hard to focus on tasks.
  • Want to withdraw from family and friends.
  • Act in a forceful or hostile way

PMS symptoms can be mild or strong. If your symptoms are severe, you may have premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). But PMDD is very rare.

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of the female reproductive organs. It usually occurs when sexually transmitted bacteria spread from your vagina to your uterus and upper genital tract.

Many women who develop pelvic inflammatory disease either experience no signs or symptoms or don't seek treatment. Pelvic inflammatory disease may be detected only later when you have trouble getting pregnant or if you develop chronic pelvic pain.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease may include:

  • Pain in your lower abdomen and pelvis
  • Heavy vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor
  • Irregular menstrual bleeding
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Low back pain
  • Fever, fatigue, diarrhea or vomiting
  • Painful or difficult urination

PID may cause only minor signs and symptoms or none at all. Asymptomatic PID is especially common when the infection is due to chlamydia.

When to see a doctor

Go to the emergency room if you experience the following severe signs and symptoms of PID:

  • Severe pain low in your abdomen
  • Vomiting
  • Signs of shock, such as fainting
  • Fever, with a temperature higher than 101 F (38.3 C)

If your signs and symptoms aren't severe, but they're persistent, see your doctor as soon as possible. Vaginal discharge with an odor, painful urination or bleeding between menstrual cycles can be associated with a sexually transmitted infection (STI). If these signs and symptoms appear, stop having sex and see your doctor soon. Prompt treatment of an STI can help prevent PID.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus the endometrium grows outside your uterus (endometrial implant). Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, bowel or the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond your pelvic region.

In endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions abnormal tissue that binds organs together.

Endometriosis can cause pain sometimes severe especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

Symptoms

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual pain that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain has increased over time.

Common signs and symptoms of endometriosis may include:

Painful periods (dysmenorrhea).

Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before and extend several days into your period and may include lower back and abdominal pain.

Pain with intercourse.

Pain during or after sex is common with endometriosis.

Pain with bowel movements or urination.

You're most likely to experience these symptoms during your period.

Excessive bleeding.

You may experience occasional heavy periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

Infertility.

Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility.

Other symptoms.

You may also experience fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods

The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have extensive pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all.

Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis.